Torah Portion Naso/Porzione di Torah Naso
Village of Hope & Justice Ministry  - Cod. Fisc. 95117280636
My Blog

Torah Portion Naso/Porzione di Torah Naso

Shabbat Shalom,
 
Welcome to our Torah study on this week’s portion of Scripture, which is called Naso (Lift Up or Elevate).
 
NASO (Lift Up/Elevate)
Numbers 4:21–7:89; Judges 13:2–25; Ephesians 1:1–23







 
“The LORD spoke to Moses, saying, ‘Take a census of the sons of Gershon also, by their fathers' houses and by their clans.’” (Numbers 4:21–22)

Last week, in Parasha Bamidbar, a census was taken of the Israelite men of draftable age. The Levites, who were given the duty to serve in the Sanctuary in the place of Israel’s firstborn, were excluded.
 
The title of this week’s Parasha, Naso, means lift up or elevate. It was the term used to take a head count (census) of the children of Israel. In the Hebrew it reads, “Lift up the heads” (נָשֹׂא אֶת רֹאשׁ  naso et rosh).
 
This week, the headcount of the Israelites is completed with a census of the Levites who are between the ages of 30 and 50. They are to do the work of transporting the Mishkan (Tabernacle).
 
Besides discussing the duties of the Levites, this Scripture portion also provides the law of the nazir, or Nazirite, and the Aaronic Benediction (Birkat Kohanim — ברכת כהנים), more commonly known as the Priestly Blessing.






The High Priest Blessing Israel




















The Nazirite Vow
 
“When a man or a woman utters a Nazirite vow... he shall abstain from new and old wine... grape-beverages, grapes and raisins ...” (Numbers 6:2–3)
 
A man or woman who vows to abstain from cutting their hair, touching a corpse, and eating grapes and grape products, including drinking wine, is called a Nazirite, or Nazir (נָזִיר) in Hebrew.
 
The word comes from the root NZR (נזר), which means to dedicate or separate oneself (as in keeping oneself separate from grapes and wine). Another word from the same root is nezer (נֵזֶר), which means crown, consecration, and separation.
 
We can see the intersection of these ideas in Numbers 6:7–8, which discusses the Nazir. It reads, “They must not make themselves ceremonially unclean … because the symbol of their dedication[crown (nezerנֵזֶר)] to God is on their head. Throughout the period of their dedication[nezer], they are consecrated [kadosh / holyto the LORD.” (Numbers 6:7–8)
 
Through this vow, the layman’s status was raised to something approaching the status of priest.
 
This level of sanctity is seen in that, like the High Priest, the Nazirite could not contaminate him or herself by coming into contact with a corpse, even one of an immediate family member.
 
As well, the Nazirite abstains from intoxicants more stringently than the priests, who abstain only during their term in the Sanctuary. Moreover, the focus of sanctity for both the Nazirite and High Priest is their head (compare Numbers 6:7to Exodus 29:7 and Leviticus 21:10).

Although most people are not to stay separate or aloof from society but, rather, to bring holiness into the world in which we live, Nazirites are allowed to do so.
 
Amos underlines the holiness of the Nazirites, connecting them to prophets: “I set up prophets from your sons and Nazirites from your young men.” (Amos 2:11)
 
The rabbis believe that in the Messianic Era, there will be no need for separation from worldly matters since they will no longer negatively impact us. Instead, since all will abound in peace and beauty, our single-minded focus will be to know God, to love, serve, and worship Him forever. This will fulfill the holiness of the Nazirite vow.
 
Jewish people pray for the coming of that Messianic era and God’s salvation (in Hebrew, Yeshuahיְשׁוּעָה) every day. They say in their daily prayers, “Every day (and all day long) we hope for Your salvation.” Or in the version of the Thirteen Principles of the Faith, they pray: “I await his coming every day.”

The Birkat Kohanim: Priestly Blessing
 
In this Parasha, God commands the Kohanim (Jewish High Priests / descendants of Aaron, brother of Moses) to impart a blessing (Numbers 6:24–26) called the Birkat Kohanim to the people of Israel through the following three-part benediction:
 
May the LORD bless you and guard/keep you.
May the LORD make His face shed light upon you and be gracious unto you.
May the LORD lift up His face unto you and give you peace.
 
To impart this blessing, the priests lift their hands with palms outstretched and facing downwards.
 
While the Sephardic communities today simply raise their hands above their heads and separate their fingers with their arms outstretched, Ashkenazi communities see the hands of the Kohanim forming windows through which the blessings flow, as explained in the Midrash (Jewish commentary).
 
The Midrash compares this stance with a passage in the Song of Songs, which suggests that God’s Shekhinah (Divine Presence) stands behind the Kohanim who bless the people:
 
“... therefore the priests spread their palms, to say that the Holy One stands behind us. And so it is written: ‘There He stands behind our wall, gazing through the window, peering through the lattice.’ (Song of Songs 2:9) ‘Gazing through the window’ — through the fingers of the priests; ‘peering through the lattice’ — when they spread their palms, therefore it says ‘Thus shall you bless them.’”  (Tanhuma (Buber) Parashat Naso, Article 15, cited by netivot-shalom)




























The Difference Between Prayers and Blessings
 
“The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective.” (James 5:16)
 
The rabbis make a distinction between blessing and prayer.
 
The blessing of a tzadik (righteous man) imparts to us whatever God has intended for our life.
 
For example, when Jacob blessed his grandchildren, Menasheh and Ephraim, Jacob crossed his hands to give the greater blessing to Ephraim rather than Menasheh. This was not his personal decision; he was being guided by Adonai to give the blessing He intended for these particular tribes.
 
Prayer, however, can also change circumstances for the better.
 
It can cause a sick person to recover, a single person to find their bashert (chosen match), and a person plagued by poverty to have their needs met.
 
The Birkat Kohanim, however, acts as both a blessing and a prayer. The Kohanim bless us with God’s peace, protection, favor, and grace; but as a prayer, it can also change our circumstances for the better.

Pronouncing the Blessing Today
 
“And He took the children in His arms, placed His hands on them and blessed them.” (Mark 10:16)
 
Because their lineage has been preserved over thousands of years, the Kohanim still stand up to bless the people in synagogues and Jewish communities all over the world.
 
In Israel, the Western Wall Plaza (Kotel) is packed with people who come at special festival times to receive the Aaronic Benediction from the Kohanim in Jerusalem.
 
Although the blessing comes through the raised hands of the Kohanim, God makes it clear that it is His blessing being transmitted through the Priests as His chosen vessels.  
 
God said, “So they shall put My name on the children of Israel, and I will bless them.” (Numbers 6:27)
 
Not only did God place His name on the hands of the Kohanim, He also engraved the names of the children of Israel on the palms of His hands (Isaiah 49:16).

This blessing continues to be recited today in Jewish families.
 
In the Brit Chadashah (New Covenant), we see that blessings are also imparted through hands. Believers in Yeshua also have the power to bless and even heal by the laying on of hands.
 
“They will be able to handle snakes with safety, and if they drink anything poisonous, it won't hurt them. They will be able to place their hands on the sick, and they will be healed.” (Mark 16:18)
 
Many Messianic congregations pronounce the Birkat Kohanim, blessing those assembled in their services.
 
Ultimately, the Birkat Kohanim is about experiencing intimacy with God. May our lives be a living testimony of this intimacy, of a people with holy hands and sanctified hearts and heads who carry with them the Presence of the God of Israel.



Shabbat Shalom,
 
Benvenuti al nostro Studio della Porzione di Torah di questa settimana, chiamata Naso (Alza o Eleva).
 
NASO (Alza o Eleva).
Numeri 4: 21-7: 89; Giudici 13, 2-25; Efesini 1: 1-23
 
“L'Eterno parlò a Mosè, dicendo: "Fai un censimento anche dei figli di Gerson, delle case dei loro padri e dei loro clan”. (Numeri 4: 21-22)
 
La scorsa settimana, nella Parasha Bamidbar, è stato preso un censimento degli uomini Israeliti di età minima di vent’anni. I leviti, che avevano il dovere di servire nel Santuario al posto dei primogeniti di Israele, sono stati esclusi da tale censimento.
 
Il titolo della Parasha di questa settimana, Naso, significa alza o eleva. Esso è il termine usato per censire i figli di Israele. In ebraico si legge, “Alza la testa” (נָשֹׂא אֶת  רֹאשׁ - naso et rosh). 

Questa settimana, il numero degli Israeliti è completato con un censimento dei Leviti che sono tra i 30 ei 50 anni. Devono fare il lavoro di trasporto del Mishkan (Tabernacolo).

Oltre a discutere dei loro compiti, questa porzione della Scrittura fornisce anche la legge del “nazir”, o “Nazirite”, la Benedizione di Aaronne (Birkat Kohanim - ברכת כהנים), Più comunemente conosciuto come la benedizione sacerdotale.

Il voto di Nazirite
 
“Quando un uomo o una donna pronuncia un voto nazireato ... egli deve astenersi dal nuovo e vecchio vino ... dall’uva e dalle bevande alcooliche, dall’uva e uva passa ...” (Numeri 6: 2-3)
 
Il Nazir è un uomo o una donna che promette di astenersi dal tagliare i capelli, che non tocca un cadavere e non mangia uva e prodotti dell’ uva, compreso il vino, egli/ella viene chiamato/a nazireo/a, o Nazir (נָזִיר) in ebraico.
 
La parola viene dalla radice NZR (נזר), il che significa dedicato o separato (come nel mantenersi separati dalle uve e dal vino). Un'altra parola dalla stessa radice è Nezer (נֵזֶר), il che significa Corona, consacrazione e separazione.
 
Possiamo vedere l'intersezione di queste idee in Numeri 6: 7 -8, che parla del Nazir. Si legge, “Non devono farsi cerimonialmente impuri ... perché il simbolo della loro dedizione [corona (nezerנֵזֶר)] a Dio è sulla loro testa. Durante tutto il periodo della loro dedizione [Nezer], sono consacrati [Kadosh /Santo] all'Eterno” (Numeri 6: 7-8)
 
Attraverso questo voto, lo status di laico è stato elevato a qualcosa che si avvicina allo status di prete.
 
Questo livello di santità è come quello del sommo sacerdote. Il Nazirite non poteva contaminarsi entrando in contatto con un cadavere, nemmeno con un membro immediato della famiglia.
 
Inoltre, il Nazirite si astiene da elementi intossicanti più rigorosamente dei sacerdoti, che si astengono solo durante il loro mandato nel Santuario. Inoltre, la focalizzazione della santità sia per il Nazirite che per il Sommo Sacerdote è sulla loro testa (confrontate Numeri 6: 7, Esodo 29: 7 e il Levitico 21:10).

Anche se la maggior parte delle persone non deve restare separata o allontanata dalla società, ma, piuttosto, portare la santità nel mondo in cui viviamo, i Naziriti sono autorizzati a farlo.
 
Amos sottolinea la santità dei Naziriti, collegandoli ai profeti: “Ho messo profeti fra i vostri figli e nazirei tra i vostri giovani.” (Amos 2:11)
 
I rabbini credono che nell'Era Messianica non ci sarà necessità di separazione dal mondo poiché non ci saranno più negatività. Invece, dal momento che tutti abbonderanno in pace e bellezza, il nostro unico pensiero sarà concentrato sulla conoscenza di Dio, sull’ amarLo, servirLo, e adorarLo per sempre. Questo compirà la santità del voto nazirita.
 
La gente ebraica prega per la venuta dell’epoca messianica e della Salvezza di Dio(In ebraico, Shekinah -יְשׁוּעָה) tutti i giorni. Dicono nelle loro preghiere quotidiane, “Ogni giorno (e per tutto il giorno) ci auguriamo per la vostra salvezza.” O nella versione dei tredici principi della fede, pregano: “Attendo la Sua venuta tutti i giorni”

Birkat Kohanim: Benedizione Sacerdotale
 
In questo Parasha, Dio comanda i Kohanim (Sacerdoti Ebrei / discendenti di Aaronne, fratello di Mosè) di benedire (Numeri 6: 24-26) attraverso la Birkat Kohanim il popolo di Israele attraverso la seguente benedizione divisa in tre parti:
 
Il Signore vi benedica e vi guardi/tenga (protegga).
Il Signore faccia che il Suo volto faccia luce su di te e ti dia grazia.
Il Signore sollevi il Suo volto su di te e ti dia pace.
 
Per dare questa benedizione, i sacerdoti sollevano le mani con i palmi distesi e rivolti verso il basso.
 
Mentre le comunità Sefardiche oggi alzano solo le loro mani al di sopra delle loro teste e separano le dita con le braccia aperte, le comunità Ashkenazi vedono le mani del Kohanim come finestre, attraverso le quali le benedizioni scorrono, come spiegato nel commento del Midrash (commentario ebraica).
 
Il Midrash paragona questa posizione con un passaggio nel Cantico dei Cantici, che suggerisce che sia Dio Shekhinah (Presenza Divina) che sorge dietro i Kohanim che benedicono la gente:

“... perciò i sacerdoti si diffusero, dicendo “il Santo (Kadosh) è dietro di noi”. E così è scritto: “Là sta dietro il muro, guardando attraverso la finestra, guardando attraverso il reticolo”. (Canto 2: 9) “Guardare attraverso la finestra” - attraverso le dita dei sacerdoti; “Sbirciare attraverso il reticolo” - quando distendendo i palmi delle loro mani, significa Così li benedirai”. 

La differenza tra le preghiere e le benedizioni
 
“La preghiera di una persona giusta è potente ed efficace”. (Giacomo 5:16)
 
I rabbini distinguono la benedizione e la preghiera.
 
La benedizione di a Tzadik (Uomo giusto) Ci fornisce ciò che Dio ha inteso per la nostra vita.
 
Ad esempio, quando Giacobbe benedisse i suoi nipoti, Menasheh e Efraim, Giacobbe incrociò le mani per dare la benedizione maggiore a Efraim piuttosto che a Menasheh. Questa non era la sua decisione personale; Era stato guidato da Adonai per dare la benedizione che intendeva per queste tribù particolari.
 
La preghiera, tuttavia, può anche cambiare le circostanze per il meglio.
 
Può portare guarigione in una persona malata, la propria anima gemella, la loro bashert (unione scelta), e la copertura dei propri bisogni in una persona afflitta dalla povertà.
 
I Birkat Kohanim, tuttavia, fungono da benedizione e da preghiera. I Kohanim ci benedicono con la pace, la protezione, il favore e la grazia di Dio; Ma la preghiera, può inoltre cambiare le nostre circostanze per il meglio.

Pronunciando oggi la benedizione
 
“E ha portato i bambini nelle sue braccia, ha messo le mani su di loro e li ha benedetti”. (Marco 10:16)
 
Dal momento che la loro origine è stata conservata in migliaia di anni, i Kohanim sono ancora in piedi per benedire il popolo in sinagoghe e comunità ebraiche in tutto il mondo.
 
In Israele, la spianata del tempio è ricca di persone che vengono per festeggiamenti speciali e per ricevere la benedizione di Aaronne dai Kohanim a Gerusalemme.
 
Anche se la benedizione viene attraverso le mani sollevate del Kohanim, Dio lo chiarisce che è la Sua benedizione che viene trasmessa Attraverso i sacerdoti come le sue navi scelte.  
 
Dio disse: “Quindi metteranno il mio nome sui figliuoli d'Israele e li benedirò”. (Numeri 6:27)
 
Non solo Dio ha posto il Suo nome sulle mani dei Kohanim, Egli ha inciso anche i nomi dei figli d'Israele sui palmi delle sue mani (Isaia 49:16). Questa benedizione continua ad essere recitata oggi nelle famiglie ebraiche.

Nel Brit Chadashah (Nuova Alleanza/Nuovo Testamento), Vediamo che le benedizioni vengono impartite anche attraverso le mani. I credenti in Yeshua hanno anche il potere di benedire e persino di guarire attraverso l’imposizione delle mani.
 
“prenderanno in mano dei serpenti; anche se berranno qualche veleno, non ne avranno alcun male; imporranno le mani agli ammalati ed essi guariranno.” (Marco 16:18)
 
Molte congregazioni messianiche pronunciano il Birkat Kohanim, benedicendo coloro che si sono riuniti nei loro culti. In definitiva, i Birkat Kohanim sono il segno della nostra intimità con Dio. Possa la nostra vita essere una testimonianza viva di questa intimità, di un popolo con le mani sante e cuori purificati e teste che portano con loro la presenza del Dio di Israele.





Shabbat morning service / Culto Sabatto mattina:
To listen, please click on the link below and download. Per ascoltare, per favore, cliccare sul link sottostante e scaricalo:


0 Comments to Torah Portion Naso/Porzione di Torah Naso:

Comments RSS

Add a Comment

Your Name:
Email Address: (Required)
Website:
Comment:
Make your text bigger, bold, italic and more with HTML tags. We'll show you how.
Post Comment
RSS Follow Become a Fan

Delivered by FeedBurner


Recent Posts

Time of Judgement/Tempo di Giudizio
Parasha Korach
Parasha Shelach Lecha (Send Forth)/Parasha Shelach Lecha (manda o invia per te)
Torah Portion Behaalotecha: The Light of the Menorah and the Holy Spirit Torah Porzione Behaalotekha: La luce della Menorah e dello Spirito Santo
La tua stanza di Eliseo alla Casa di Preghiera e Accoglienza Messianica di Pozzuoli/Your Elisha Room at the Messianic House of Prayer and Hospitality Puteoli

Most Popular Posts

ASILO NIDO FAMIGLIA BILINGUE A DOMICILIO
Welcome to Your Family Home: Start Up Imma: The Mommy’s Start Up
IO SONO LA VITE, VOI SIETE I TRALCI
SUMMER CAMP 2013 UPDATES
SUMMER CAMP 2013

Categories

"Messianic Bible Studies Series" Registration
A MOBILE COLLEGE
BACK TO SCHOOL 2013
BAMBINI DALLA SCUOLA DI STRADA ALLA SCUOLA IN CASA
Baxk To School 2014
Believe
BIBBIA PROFETICA MESSIANICA ANNO 5775 PRIMA PORZIONE DI TORAH DELL'ANNO
Casa di Preghiera & Accoglienza Place of Shalom Pozzuoli, Napoli
Casa di preghiera di Gerusalemme
Cio' in cui crediamo
Come l'Apostolo Paolo
Con i miei occhi la biblioteca per i nonni e i disabili visivi
CORSI AUTUNNALI SETTIMANALI
CORSI DI ITALIANO PER STRANIERI
CORSO DI CUCITO
CORSO DI DECOUPAGE
CORSO DI EBRAICO BIBLICO A POZZUOLI IN SEDE E ONLINE SONO APERTE LE ISCRIZIONI
Daily Drop
Daily Mitzvah (Maimonides)
Daily Prayer Points
Daily Tehillim
Daily Wisdom
Daily Word
EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLE Welcome to Your Family Home: Start Up Imma: The Mommy’s Start Up
English Courses for You
EVENTO TRE PER DUE
Facilitating and enhancing social inclusion of people with special needs
Generate a list of Yahrzeit dates, Hebrew Birthdays, or Hebrew Anniversaries for the next 20 years
Healing
Holocaust Memorial Day
II Porzione di Torah dell'anno 5775
IO SONO LA VITE, VOI SIETE I TRALCI
Israel Updates
Italian House of Prayer Jerusalem/Casa di Preghiera Italiana a Gerusalemme
Kehila News Israel
La Stanza di Elia/Elijah Room
LEADERSHIP COURSE
Messianic Bible
Missione la pupilla del suo occhio 2015
MISSSION 3721
Monthly Newsletter
My Dream
ORFANI E VEDOVE
Our Tithes to Israel - Le Nostre Decime a Israele
Prayer Points
Raccolta Fondi Asilo Nido Bilingue Gratuito de L'Aquila
Raccolta Fondi per Emergenza Terremoto Amatrice, Italia - Fundraising Earthquake Emergency for Italy
RECUPERO MATERIA SCOLASTICA INGLESE
Scriptural References and daily Prayer Points
SERVIZI DI GUIDA TURISTICA E ACCOMPAGNATORI TURISTICI (CORRIERI)
SHINE PROJECT - FREE WORKSHOP
SMALL THINGS MAKE BIG CHANGES IN PEOPLE LIVES
START-UP IMMA (in ebraico mamma)
Start-Up Imma al Social Lab - Il Forum Regionale sulle Politiche Sociali - 13 Febbraio 2015 Pescara,
SUMMER CAMP 2013
TEA Parties
Teacher's Hunt!
Tempi di Gloria
The Children of Zion, His Holy People.
The Day of Prayer for the Persecuted Church
The Marriage Service
THE PATH OF THE GODS & THE CALL OF GOD 13 APRIL 2013
This is Christmas - (Questo e' Natale) - Evento Gratuito per bambini - Domenica 14, 21, 28 Dicem
This is Revival 2013 (Questo e' Risveglio 2013)
Time of Judgement/Tempi di Giudizio
Times of Glory Isaiah 66:18
TRAVEL TO ISRAEL 2013
TRAVEL TO UK 2013
Village of Hope & Justice Ministry (Onlus) Israele
Village of Hope & Justice MInistry Bible Studies
VILLAGE OF HOPE & JUSTICE MINISTRY MOBILE COLLEGE
Village of Hope & Justice Ministry Onlus Offerta Formativa Estate 2014
WAILING WALL: PRAYER REQUESTS AND ANSWERS TO PRAYER
Weekly Stories from Israel
Weekly Torah Portion
Welocome Home - Your room in Jerusalem - Italian House of Prayer Jerusalem
What we believe
Yad HaShoah Holocaust Memorial Day
Yamim Nora’im Anno 5775
Yom Kippur 5777 Appeal

Archives

June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
July 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
April 2014
January 2014
December 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013

powered by

Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint